Book Wisdom

A Few Lessons From Stuart Little About Life, Family, and Friendship

I recently got back into puzzles. Yes, this is also a very random way to start a blog post, but I blame Target. While Christmas shopping, they had puzzles on sale (it was of a tiger) and for reasons I still don’t know, I thought “that sounds fun, I’m going to buy myself a Christmas gift.” It’s been at least two decades since I’ve done a puzzle, but I enjoyed it and found it relaxing, so I bought myself another one. This time featuring covers of famous children’s books. After I finished that one, I did what any book nerd would deem necessary – decided read all the books featured in the puzzle throughout the coming months (It’s gonna be such a struggle when I have to re-read The Hobbit and the two books from The Chronicles of Narnia).

Thus bringing me to a little mouse named Stuart Little. I have a small collection of children’s books and since I already owned this one, it’s the one I started with.

While not Charlotte’s Web nor E.B.’s best work, I think it’s still a fun read for children. It’s a random collection of Stuart’s adventures, with only a few tied together. It ends without some answers, but there are plenty of takeaways. I thought the end quote was quite fitting for life.

We always don’t know what the outcome will be (in Stuart’s case, if he will find his best friend, Margalo), but that shouldn’t stop us from moving forward:

“Stuart rose from the ditch, climbed into his car, and started up the road that led toward the north. The sun was just coming over the hills on his right. As he peered ahead into the great land that stretched before him, the way seemed long. But the sky was bright, and he somehow felt he was headed in the right direction.”

Just like a life of faith. Sometimes it’s enough to know you’re headed in the right direction, even if you don’t know the final destination.

Stuart also teaches us how fulfilling life can be when we live it to the fullest, whether that’s seeking adventures in our own backyard or taking some steps a bit further away. He was always up for trying something different or something new.

We also see his love for home. Never is his family and home far from his thoughts, wherever he finds himself and of course there’s friendship. True friendship is one that loves at all times. We see that in his final quest to find his best friend Margalo.

If you haven’t read a children’s book in a while, I invite you to. There’s always something to be gleaned and as my friend C.S. Lewis once wrote: “Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.”

Finally, if nothing else, how about these life rules? While “substitute teaching” Stuart asks the class what is important:

“A shaft of sunlight at the end of a dark afternoon, a note in music, and the way the back of a baby’s neck smells if its mother keeps it tidy,” answered Henry.

“Correct,” said Stuart. “Those are the important things. You forget one thing though. Mary Bendix, what did Henry Rackmeyer forget?”

“He forgot ice cream with chocolate sauce on it,” said Mary quickly.

“Exactly,” said Stuart. “Ice cream is important.”

I’m good with that.

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Book Reviews, Nonfiction

Dangerous Prayers by Thomas Nelson Gift

World-changers. Rebels. Rejecters of the status quo. Throughout history, Christians were never meant to have a safe faith.

Learn from the brave ones who have gone before you with Dangerous Prayers, an inspiring collection of prayers from people who have changed the world. Exploring historical figures, cultural icons, political leaders, saints, and martyrs, this book offers you a rich visual experience to explore the power of dynamic prayers.

From St. Francis of Assisi to Harriett Tubman to Billy Graham, God can use ordinary people who pray courageous prayers to do extraordinary things for Him. No matter your age, position, or status, praying dangerous prayers will change your life—and likely the world around you as well.

Gain wisdom from the prayer lives of spiritual giants and invigorate your faith as you consider those who came before you with Dangerous Prayers.

I love history and I love reading about those who came before us in the faith. Reading bits and pieces about these people is always encouraging because you see so clearly how God works. I love the idea behind this book. Sharing the dangerous prayers of those who have changed the world is inspiring in so many ways.

There is one thing I need to say though. As you know, if you’ve been around the blog for a minute or two, race and America are important topics to me. We can’t heal if we don’t acknowledge the sins of those before us, so I must ask, why do we keep including certain people in our heroes of faith? Two examples in this book are George Whitefield and Jonathan Edwards. Whitefield was pro slavery. He actively taught that slavery was good and justified it. He believed Africans and African Americans were subordinate. Edwards himself owned slaves.

As Christians, we need to stop praising people who played a hand in keeping one of America’s darkest sins alive and running. I don’t expect our past leaders to have been perfect, but they never realized their sin nor repented. The church then and now is made up of millions of people they helped to keep enslaved. The ripples of their actions continue today.

I’m also not saying we remove them from our church history – all the more reason to actually keep them, as it shows how racism was in the church for centuries – but we also don’t need to include them in every hall of faith type of book Christians publish. We can only move forward when we acknowledge the past.

Outside of that, I really liked this collection. From voices in ministry, to activists, to artists, this shows how God will use you where you are at. They also featured men and women of different backgrounds and cultures.

Book Reviews, Nonfiction

The Color of Compromise by Jemar Tisby | Book Review

Given the centuries of Christian compromise with bigotry, believers today must be prepared to tear down old structures and build up new ones.

In August of 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, calling on all Americans to view others not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. Yet King included another powerful word, one that is often overlooked. Warning against the “tranquilizing drug of gradualism,” King emphasized the fierce urgency of now, the need to resist the status quo and take immediate action.

King’s call to action, first issued over fifty years ago, is relevant for the church in America today. Churches remain racially segregated and are largely ineffective in addressing complex racial challenges. In The Color of Compromise, Jemar Tisby takes us back to the root of this injustice in the American church, highlighting the cultural and institutional tables we have to flip in order to bring about progress between black and white people.

Tisby provides a unique survey of American Christianity’s racial past, revealing the concrete and chilling ways people of faith have worked against racial justice. Understanding our racial history sets the stage for solutions, but until we understand the depth of the malady we won’t fully embrace the aggressive treatment it requires. Given the centuries of Christian compromise with bigotry, believers today must be prepared to tear down old structures and build up new ones. This book provides an in-depth diagnosis for a racially divided American church and suggests ways to foster a more equitable and inclusive environment among God’s people.

I thought about writing a few paragraph of a review, but honestly, I don’t think I need to add much more. The church needs to read this book. Will it be hard for some? Will some want to jump to the defensive? Absolutely. But it’s too important of a topic to not read it, work through it, ask questions, pray, and work to bring healing.

This book is needed. This book is important. Please, read it.

Book Reviews

If You Need A Couple More Book Ideas For Christmas…

I was going through some books this morning (deciding which books to take on vacation is no easy task ;), and thought I would share a few books for those looking for some last minute ideas. They’re different genres and styles, so if you were stuck, hopefully this will help you!

  • For the person who wants to dive deeper in history (and wants to create change): The Color of Compromise by Jemar Tisby
  • For the person who loves stories of friendship (and wants to learn about people different from them): Once We Were Strangers by Shawn Smucker
  • For the thinker and writer (and journal collector 😉: Burning Ships (A Guided Journal) by Douglas Mann
  • For the person who likes to laugh (or teaches English!): P is for Pterodactyl by Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter
  • For the person who loves literature and story (because Jack is awesome): On Stories by C.S. Lewis

Merry Christmas everyone!!

Book Reviews, Nonfiction

The Infographic Bible | Review

I really liked the idea behind this Bible resource. There are infographics on a variety of topics and a mix of art work, charts, etc. It’s not a book you can go through in one setting, since there’s such an abundance of information. If you tried to in one setting, you’d get overwhelmed rather quickly, but I kinda like that there’s a ton of info to dive into. My one qualm with it is that the font is sometimes really small, making it hard to read.

It’s definitely worth looking into though.

(Thank you to BookLook Bloggers for a copy of the book. All views expressed are my own.)

ABOUT THE BOOK:
It doesn’t just tell you the story—it shows you the story.

Powerful infographics reveal new beauty and depth of understanding as you engage with Scripture’s story in a fresh, visual way. Taking inspiration from the imagery Jesus evoked with His picturesque parables, The Infographic Bible reveals the character of God, his Word, and his redemptive plan in 84 stunning infographics.

Features:

  • 84 stunning infographics explain the character of God, his Word, and his redemptive plan
  • Scripture excerpts throughout the book taken from the New Revised Standard Version, the New King James Version, and the Good News Translation.
  • Durable cover with generous foil accents
  • Heavy, bright white paper
Book Reviews, Nonfiction

Ancient-Modern Bible | Review

Alright, my interest was immediately piqued as soon as I saw this cover and title. Ancient-Modern Bible? What exactly was this all about? So obviously, I I immediately snagged one. Here’s a bit from the intro I thought worth sharing:

“The fellowship stretches across the globe, encompassing charismatic Anglicans in Singapore, non-denominational Baptists in Long, and Orthodox believers in Rio de Janeiro. And it’s a fellowship that reaches back through time, from the very earliest disciples of Jesus living in Jerusalem, through the second-century converts in Roman-ruled Africa and Europe, to medieval monastics, and onward to reformers, pietists, missionaries, revivalists, and more.”

“Our prayer is that the Ancient-Modern Bible will encourage and strengthen you, and that your own study of this incomparable book will be enriched by the reflections and insights of faithful men and women from across the centuries who, just like you, came to Scripture to learn from the Author of life.”

I love the goal behind this Bible. By providing commentary from an array of voices throughout history, it shows the value of various thoughts and theologies and reminding Bible readers about our ultimate goal. The commentary on one page ranged from: Bonhoeffer, John Calvin, Jack Hayford and Jerome. Another section had Eugene Peterson, Spurgeon, Calvin, Henry Halley, and Augustine. Other voices ranged from C.S. Lewis, N.T. Wright, and Dallas Willard.

Other helpful features I appreciated were the brief timeline and discussion before every book, the different historical Creeds of the Church, and the essays on different doctrines and teachings of the church. One of my favorite features are the various biographies of Christian voices (including lists of important works to dive further).

Outside of the ancient voices, I didn’t see any modern voices of color (Like something from Martin Luther King Jr.). I went through a majority of the commentary and I think this was a missed opportunity, as this Bible, in its other aspects, focuses on bringing different voices together.

I would also love to see different translations. I don’t read (outside of specific research) from NKJV, so maybe that’s something we’ll see in the future.

Oh! And I loved the historical artwork in the back. I found one of my favorite paintings (Rembrandt’s “The Return of the Prodigal Son”). A great way to honor the different ways we are drawn to God.

Overall, I think it’s a worthy addition to your library.

(Thank you to BookLook Bloggers for a copy of the book. All views expressed are my own.)

ABOUT THE BOOK:
Many things have changed in the last two-thousand years. The good news of Jesus Christ isn’t one of them. The NKJV Ancient-Modern Bible features all-new book introductions, articles, and commentary from voices both ancient and modern to help you experience the Word of God as never before. Read the Bible alongside Augustine, Luther, Graham, and others—and discover the rich wisdom of ages past and present, which is the rightful inheritance of every follower of Christ. The NKJV Ancient-Modern Bible is an opportunity for readers to experience the Word of God with fresh eyes, as members of the global and historical community of faith. This is a Bible two thousand years in the making.

Features include:

  • Full-color design that uniquely blends cutting edge modern typography and layout with traditional, sacred elements
  • Bible commentary from church thinkers past and present, from Huss to Keller, from Chrysostom to Spurgeon, from Aquinas to Wright
  • Biographies of church leaders & thinkers
  • Doctrine and history articles on significant councils, creeds, and controversies
  • Sacred art from throughout church history
  • Easy-to-read 8.5-point font

More Details:

  • Thousands of verse-by-verse and passage-by-passage comments from the church’s greatest teachers and thinkers, including John Calvin, Charles Spurgeon, Augustine, John Wesley, Timothy Keller, Matthew Henry, Billy Graham, A.W. Tozer, C.S. Lewis, Henry Halley, Martin Luther, N.T. Wright, Jack Hayford, John Bunyan, Eugene Peterson, Jerome, Warren Wiersbe, R.C. Sproul, Ulrich Zwingli, D.L Moody, William Tyndale, D.A. Carson, John Knox, Scot McKnight, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Soren Kierkegaard, and John Chrysostom
  • Full page biography articles sharing the inspiring life stories of men and women who were transformed by the gospel, from the early church, through the Reformation, and beyond.
  • Sacred art as inspired by the Bible through the centuries, including Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Gustave Dore, Christian Rohlfs, and Makoto Fujimura.

Where to Buy: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | CBD | Goodreads

Changing the World

What The Hate U Give Teaches Us About Replacing Otherness with Imago Dei

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas made its debut in 2017 and has become a pivotal novel for the times we’re in. And for very good reason. It’s a book that will hit you in the gut, all the while being inspired by the strength of the characters. Now it’s on the big screen, taking the viewer into a story that has become all to common, as names become Twitter hashtags and fill our news feeds. If you aren’t familiar with the book, here’s the description:

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night?

And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

The title of the book comes from hip-hop legend Tupac Shakur and his iconic THUG LIFE tattoo. Contrary to popular (or better yet, uneducated) belief, the tattoo had a deeper meaning. The first part stood for THE HATE U GIVE and Tupac revealed it was a statement against the oppression shown to Black Americans that starts from a young age.

I highly recommend this movie and book (heads up, there’s language), as it has quite a bit to teach us about seeing Imago Dei in everyone. Here’s a few I wanted to share:

Let Us Listen.
“My dear brothers and sisters, take note of this: Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak…” James 1:19-20

Oh church, we have to be willing to stop and listen. Too often I hear “well I haven’t seen that” or “I don’t think this really happens,” etc., etc. If we don’t take the time to stop and listen to people (or only listen to one side), how can we truly learn? How can we seek out those who are hurting and be the hands and feet of Jesus to them? Be a brother or sister in Christ to them? How can we show the world this incredible joy and love we know and have, if we turn away from people? If we refuse to listen to what they have to say? There’s a scene in the book and movie (minor spoiler), where one of Starr’s closest friends stops being her friend. She no longer responds to text messages, she unfollows her on Tumblr and when Starr calls her out on it, she quickly puts it back on Starr (saying she doesn’t know who she is anymore) and walks out. In the book we see Starr’s other friend, Maya, come clean: “She’s lying…that’s not why she unfollowed you. She said she didn’t wanna see that…on her dashboard. All the ‘black stuff’, she called it. The petitions. The Black Panther pictures. That post on those four little girls who were killed in that church…”

We must listen, even when it makes us uncomfortable. Listening to a person’s pain is more important than our comfort.

Don’t be Colorblind.
God created every single shade we all are. So see a person’s color, celebrate it, and be willing to hear how their lives might be different from yours because of it. One of the significant lines from Starr is when she tells her boyfriend Chris, who is white, “If you don’t see my blackness, you don’t see me.”

Humans aren’t Issues, They’re People. People made in God’s Image.
Whether we’re talking about racism in America, immigration, refugees, or any other social issue, when we see and or use terms like “them/they” or only see the issue, we cut out and ignore the humanity every person on this planet carries. When someone’s life is only an issue, it’s easy to ignore.

Church, this isn’t Jesus.

When we move from seeing people as fellow human beings and instead see them as categories or issues we don’t agree with/understand or “them,” we lose. We lose the chance to show love. We lose the chance to be a witness. We lose the chance to be light in an increasingly dark world. How can we make an impact if we instantly categorize people who don’t fit in our worldview or share our life experiences? We also lose the chance to meet incredible people and friends.

We can’t let political affiliations become the Christians standard. Jesus is neither Republican nor Democrat. As believers, we cannot live and die by a political party. We live & die by the Gospel. Otherwise we lose sight of our most important calling – to love people. That’s the Gospel.

I learned that from Jesus. He constantly walked and ministered to “the others” the religious considered dirty and ones to avoid. Whether that was the Roman centurion (Matthew 8:5-13), the Samaritan woman (John 4), the adulterous woman (John 8:1-11), or countless others who encountered Jesus.

It is our duty to open our ears and hearts and hear their cry. It is our duty to show the world the Light we follow. It is that Light Who will break chains, change hearts, and make a lasting impact that will echo throughout eternity.

It isn’t easy, it isn’t comfortable and it forces people to take a hard look at where their heart is, BUT when we do, we see each other as God wants us to.

“A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another.” John 13:34

“Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins.” 1 Peter 4:8

“Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love. Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.” Ephesians 4:2-3

Author Interviews

Interview with Lynn Austin

Happy mid-October everyone! Today, I’m excited to share more behind-the-scenes with Lynn Austin and her latest release, Legacy of Mercy! I hope you enjoy this interview and be sure to snag a copy of Legacy of Mercy if you haven’t already!

Legacy of Mercy released on October 2nd and will be the first sequel you’ve ever written. What made you decide to write a sequel?

My readers decided for me! I received many, many letters from them asking if there would be a sequel to “Waves of Mercy.” The main character, Anna, is only in her twenties and is a new Christian, so when she decides to return to Chicago and marry her fiancé at the end of the book, readers wanted to know what happens next in her life. The more I thought about it, the more I wanted to explore what happens next for Anna, too. She has just discovered who her birth mother is, so naturally she’ll want to learn more about her. She’ll also want to solve the mystery of who her real father is and what became of him. What if he is still alive? Lots of material for a story here, especially when the other people in Anna’s life try to discourage her investigations.

You are known for writing multi-generational books and Legacy of Mercy is no exception. What intrigues you about writing in this style?

I enjoy creating women’s personalities from various eras and exploring how the roles and opportunities changed for women from generation to generation. I find it very interesting to see how the choices one generation makes has an influence on each generation after them. It causes me to be more thoughtful in the way I live, knowing that my children, grandchildren and even great-grandchildren may be impacted by my life.

Which character in Legacy of Mercy do you identify with the most and why?
I would have to say I identify the most with Geesje DeJonge. For one thing, she is about the same age as I am, and has lived long enough to be able to look back through the years and analyze them. She is in a position to see all of the ways and times when God carried her through—something we usually only see in hindsight, not when we’re going through the difficulties. I’m at the same stage in my life, and I can see God’s faithfulness to me in spite of the many times I questioned His wisdom.

When you sit down to write a story, do you know how it is going to end? Describe your writing process. How do you stay disciplined and not get distracted?
I never know how a story will end when I start writing. I rarely even know what comes next when I’m writing a chapter! I begin with the historical setting, and as I’m doing my research, my characters usually begin to take shape in my mind. I flesh them out by developing resumes for them so that they become real people in my mind, with backgrounds and personalities. Then I figure out where to begin the novel and simply make up the plot as I go along. If I’m surprised then the reader will be surprised.

My deadline keeps me disciplined. I know that if I write a certain number of pages a day, I’ll finish the book on time. I also know how very hard it is to write well when I’m behind schedule and a deadline is looming. Wanting to avoid that last minute panic keeps me disciplined on a daily basis.

As for distractions—there are so many! Over the years, I’ve had to learn when to put the book aside and enjoy a pleasant distraction (an old friend who has come to town, an afternoon with my husband), and when there’s no value in the distraction and it will only make the writing process harder.

Did anything surprise you about the Legacy of Mercy story?
Yes. One of the main characters ends up in an impossible situation, which put me in an impossible situation as I tried to figure out what to do! But I just kept writing and the dilemma untangled in a very natural but surprising way. (You’ll see when you read it!) Also, the ending surprised me—a lot! I hope that all of my readers who asked for a sequel are pleased with it.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

For many years, Lynn Austin nurtured a desire to write but frequent travels and the demands of her growing family postponed her career. When her husband’s work took Lynn to Bogota, Colombia, for two years, she used the B.A. she’d earned at Hope College and Southern Connecticut State University to work as a teacher. After returning to the U.S., the Austins moved to Anderson, Indiana, Thunder Bay, Ontario, and later to Winnipeg, Manitoba.

It was during the long Canadian winters at home with her children that Lynn made progress on her dream to write, carving out a few hours of writing time each day while her children napped. Lynn credits her early experience of learning to write amid the chaos of family life for her ability to be a productive writer while making sure her family remains her top priority.

Extended family is also very important to Austin, and it was a lively discussion between Lynn, her mother, grandmother, and daughter concerning the change in women’s roles through the generations that sparked the inspiration for her novel Eve’s Daughters.

Along with reading, two of Lynn’s lifelong passions are history and archaeology. While researching her Biblical fiction series, Chronicles of the Kings, these two interests led her to pursue studies in Biblical Backgrounds and Archaeology through Southwestern Theological Seminary. She and her son traveled to Israel during the summer of 1989 to take part in an archaeological dig at the ancient city of Timnah. This experience contributed to the inspiration for her novel Wings of Refuge.

Lynn resigned from teaching to write full-time in 1992. Since then she has published 27 novels. Eight of her historical novels have won Christy Awards for excellence in Christian Fiction: Hidden Places (2001), Candle in the Darkness (2002), Fire by Night (2003), A Proper Pursuit (2007), Until We Reach Home (2008), Though Waters Roar (2009), While We’re Far Apart (2010), and Wonderland Creek (2011). She was inducted into the Christy Award Hall of Fame in 2013. Fire by Night was also one of only five inspirational fiction books chosen by Library Journal for their top picks of 2003, and All She Ever Wanted was chosen as one of the five inspirational top picks of 2005. Lynn’s novel Hidden Places has been made into a movie for the Hallmark Channel, starring actress Shirley Jones. Ms Jones received a 2006 Emmy Award nomination for her portrayal of Aunt Batty in the film.

Love and Faith

Be Brave, Not Safe

It was my dream job, but it was hundreds of miles away.

I always knew that if God opened the doors into the publishing industry, I would have to leave where I was living at the time: Austin, TX. And let me tell you, I love that city! I had incredible community, deep friendships, and a church that challenged and encouraged me. Plus, the food…it’s some of the best in the world. Really, it is.

As soon as I got the offer though, I knew I was leaving. I had been applying to publishing jobs for two years. I knew God opened the door I had been praying for. But would it be worth it? Would it be worth it to leave everything behind to such a great unknown?

Prior to my job interview, 98% of my experience with Colorado had been with the Denver airport. I hated cold weather. I didn’t know a soul in the city or of any churches. It was terrifying, even while exciting. Would I make friends? Would I find a church I loved? Would I survive winter?!?

The Lord was faithful through that season and He continued to remind me of this truth in so many ways. Through scriptures like this one found in Ephesians:

“Now to Him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to His power that is at work within us.” Ephesians 3:20 (NIV)

But He also spoke to me in one of my love languages: Fiction. In C.S. Lewis’ The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Aslan (the Lion who represents Jesus) has seemingly remained quiet in the land of Narnia as the terrible White Witch has claimed it as her own. Slowly things start to change, the never ending winter begins to melt and true Narnians began to have hope.

Aslan was on the move.

He was on the move in my life too. Did that mean my fear went away? Nope, but it gave me the courage to be brave. Just like in the book, where even though Aslan was moving to destroy the hold the White Witch had over Narnia, the four Pevensies siblings (and array of amazing creatures created by Lewis) still had to fight. They still had to choose to be brave. Safety wasn’t an option. But they had the best guide. One of my favorite lines about Aslan comes from Mr. Beaver, after one of the children asks if this Lion they kept hearing about is safe. He responds: “Safe? Course he isn’t safe. But he’s good. He’s the King, I tell you.”

“The Lord is the one who goes ahead of you; He will be with you. He will not fail you or forsake you. Do not fear or be dismayed.” Deuteronomy 31:8 (NASB)

It’s been two years now that I’ve called Colorado home and there continues to be plenty of opportunities to choose bravery over safety. Whether it is safety from failure, safety for my feelings, or safety from hurt.

It was pushing through as I searched for months for a church home. It was trusting that God would provide community, trusting that while I hadn’t connected in those first few months through different church groups, it would come. It was pushing through the awkwardness of making new friends (making new friends as an adult is hard!). And yet.

He was and is faithful.

These days? I love my church, my friends, and my community in Colorado. They are a gift to my soul. There’s plenty of times I need to remind myself about this (as life tends to send changes all the time), but I am so thankful the Lord continues to give me the strength to be brave and not safe.

Being brave isn’t fully conquering fear. It will always be there. It’s choosing to not let it stand in the way. It’s not always easy, but I’ve learned it is always worth it. When I don’t want to take that step of faith? I remember my favorite lion Aslan. I remember Who he represents and am reminded I’m not alone, Jesus will always be with me. And I can remember that “He’s wild, you know. Not like a tame lion.”

May we always choose to be wild.

“This is my command—be strong and courageous! Do not be afraid or discouraged. For the Lord your God is with you wherever you go.” Joshua 1:9 (NLT)