Movie Musings

Movie Musings | Shawshank Redemption

(Moving Musings are my thoughts on some of the all-time greats in cinema. I love story and the power that comes with it, so I thought it would be fun to occasionally post about them. Also, there shall be spoilers. If interested in past Movie Musings, just click here!)

“Hope is a good thing. Maybe the best of things. And no good thing ever dies.” Andy in Shawshank Redemption

I fell in love with this movie the first time I saw it (which I think was in college). Why is this one of the best? The storyline is incredible, it’s portrayed so well, the ending and the underlining theme of hope. It’s one of Stephen King’s finest (sidenote: how does he write a story like this and then some of the most nightmare-ish horror films?!!).

It’s still one of my favorite movies of all time.

There’s one scene where, after one of their old time buddies, Brooks, kills himself after getting out (he’d been there for decades and wasn’t able to cope with the new outside world), Andy was in the Warden’s office and played music over the speakers that belted it out to the fields and all the inmates. He locked himself in the office, so they had to break down the door to get in, but for a few moments those inmates heard something beautiful. He ended up getting a week in solitary for the act.

When he got out all his buddies asked him why he did it.

Andy: “Hope.”

Red: “Hope is a dangerous thing. Hope can drive a man insane. It’s got no use on the inside. You better get used to that idea.”

Andy” “Like Brooks did?”

Red gets up from the table angry. Andy later gives him a harmonica, but that was a profound moment, showing what people can become if they give up on hope. Yet, even with it all Andy never does.

Later, Andy continues to struggle, especially after his young friend Tommy gets murdered by the Warden because Tommy had the evidence needed to prove Andy was innocent (he was in jail for the murder of his wife and the man she was having an affair with).

Andy gets two months in solitary and after threatening to stop helping the Warden with his shady schemes, the Warden comes back with more death threats on his friends.

He finally gets out and Red immediately knows something is different. Yet, even with that Andy tells Red about Zihuatanejo, the little town he’ll go to when he gets out.

Red tells him to stop with his pipe dream since they aren’t getting out. Andy’s response?

“It comes down to a simple choice really, get busy living or get busy dying.”

“Get busy living or get busy dying.”

He makes Red promise him to find the a volcano rock and box in a field. He gives him nothing more than how to find it, but he gets him to promise to find it. Andy does escape in his brilliant dig through the walls scheme and makes it to beautiful Zihuatanejo.

A little time later, Red gets paroled after decades locked up. He follows through with Andy’s promise and heads out to Mexico to meet him.

Red’s final quote heading out to Mexico to meet his friend Andy is a perfectly fitting one:
“I hope I can make it across the border.
I hope to see my friend and shake his hand.
I hope the Pacific is as blue as it has been in my dreams.
I hope.”

Sidenote: I absolutely love Red’s character. It helps that Morgan Freeman portrayed him masterfully, but the character himself is great and I love him as the narrator.

“Hope is a good thing. Maybe the best of things. And no good thing ever dies.”

While I know this story wasn’t written with the Gospel in mind, I love that a story will still draw you to THE Story our hearts are all longing for and the HOPE we have in that.

“But now, Lord, what do I look for?
My hope is in you.” Psalm 39:7

Hope is a beautiful beautiful thing friends.

Have y’all seen this movie?

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Inklings

Tolkien and C. S. Lewis: The Gift of a Friendship by Colin Duriez | Inklings Series Discussion

(The Inklings Series is a monthly series featuring the works of my two favorites, J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, or books about them. But I don’t want it to be just me chatting about these books, so that’s where y’all come in! I’ll announce the book at least four weeks in advance of when the discussion post will go live, so you have plenty of time to get the book and read it. Then, the following month, I’ll post a discussion post and let the fun begin!!)

I wasn’t sure how reading a book not written by one of the boys would go, but I enjoyed reading a book diving more into the lives of Tolkien and Lewis. It a lot of ways, it helps me appreciate their works all the more. Now how to keep this discussion from turning into a dissertation…

First off, I think there should be an official holiday on May 11th (1926). This was the day Tolkien and Lewis first meet. All I’m saying is there could be some epic Middle Earth and Narnia mashup shenanigans happening. Or maybe we can all have a pint for the boys :). If these two weren’t a part of each others lives, we wouldn’t have LOTR or Narnia. What a dark and dreary world that would be.

I also feel we need to take a moment to appreciate the fact that it took 17 years for Tolkien to write LOTR. 17 YEARS PEOPLE. Tolkien admitted “it is written in my life-blood, such as that is, thick or thin; and I can no other.” So I dare someone to say it isn’t a well written or an entertaining story….

Both Tolkien and C.S. Lewis are literary superstars, known around the world as the creators of Middle-earth and Narnia. But few of their readers and fans know about the important and complex friendship between Tolkien and his fellow Oxford academic C.S. Lewis. Without the persistent encouragement of his friend, Tolkien would never have completed The Lord of the Rings. This great tale, along with the connected matter of The Silmarillion, would have remained merely a private hobby. Likewise, all of Lewis’ fiction, after the two met at Oxford University in 1926, bears the mark of Tolkien’s influence, whether in names he used or in the creation of convincing fantasy worlds.

They quickly discovered their affinity–a love of language and the imagination, a wide reading in northern myth and fairy tale, a desire to write stories themselves in both poetry and prose. The quality of their literary friendship invites comparisons with those of William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Cowper and John Newton, and G.K. Chesterton and Hillaire Belloc. Both Tolkien and Lewis were central figures in the informal Oxford literary circle, the Inklings.

This book explores their lives, unfolding the extraordinary story of their complex friendship that lasted, with its ups and downs, until Lewis’s death in 1963. Despite their differences–differences of temperament, spiritual emphasis, and view of their storytelling art–what united them was much stronger, a shared vision that continues to inspire their millions of readers throughout the world.

This book was a little different than I expected. It not only discusses the friendship between the two, but also looks at key works of each, when they were written and the influence of those novels. Whether it be Till We Have Faces or The Hobbit, Duriez provides overviews of their works, which readers will find helpful if they haven’t read the books discussed. I knew a bit about their friendship before reading this, but there were some things I didn’t have a clue about, so if you’re interested in learning more about these two, I definitely recommend this read!

“My happiest hours are spent with three or four old friends and old clothes tramping together and putting up in small pubs – or else sitting up till the small hours in someone’s college room talking nonsense, poetry, theology, metaphysics over beer, tea and pipes.” C.S. Lewis

I think one of my favorite parts was reading all the ways they influenced each other, from Tolkien’s guidance to C.S. Lewis’ spiritual awakening to Lewis’ constant encouragement for Tolkien to finish the Lord of the Rings. I also loved that they each dedicated some of their greatest works to The Inklings. And guess what? They were both avid readers (although I do believe Lewis takes the cake), meaning WE WOULD HAVE BEEN BEST FRIENDS.

Moving on. 🙂

I’m also pretty sure they were meant to be best friends from birth. Why?

  • They each have rad names: John Ronald Reuel Tolkien and Clive Staples Lewis
  • They both lost their moms at a young age.
  • Tolkien’s dad died earlier and Lewis’ Dad withdrew after his mother’s death and sent Clive to a boarding school (their relationship would later be restored).
  • They also both fought in WWI.

It’s pretty crazy to think of early life happenings became a connection point for them later.

Now some facts I deemed worthy to point out (also solidifying my love for these two):

  1. Tolkien commented late life that “he sought to create a mythology for England, but arguably he also tried to create a mythology for the English language.” I vote he was successful on both accounts. I would add he created a mythology for the universe. Unbiased opinion of course.
  2. There had been plans between the two to collaborate on a book together. This project never materialized and I bet it’s because they knew the universe would probably explode from the sheer amount of awesome a book like that would have contained.
  3. I’m sure there will be other books we read about C.S. Lewis’ conversion to Christianity, but I have to point out one fact: after he became a theist in 1929, by 1930, he was exploring Christianity more (with John Bunyan’s works) and decided to start reading the Bible almost daily. He started reading the book of John. What’s so exciting about that? He read it in GREEK. You know, like I’m sure we’ve all done.
  4. I love this quote by Tolkien: “In the Gospels, art has been verified.”

I can barely handle the levels of genius, internet.

“The two friends had a tangible confidence that the separation of story and fact has been reconciled, which led them to continue in a tradition of symbolic fiction, telling stories of dragons and kings in disguise, talking animals and heroic quests, set in imagined worlds.”

Some Items to Discuss

Honestly, I don’t have a ton of questions, but I am curious of any reactions, so here we go!
1. What were some of the most surprising facts?
I was surprised and found it interesting that Tolkien didn’t approve of Lewis’ role as a popular theologian. I understand where it comes from (with different church backgrounds), but still found it interesting. Yet, again, I appreciate how much they still respected each other with the differences.

2. There were several works discussed in this book and I wish I could read them all RIGHT NOW. Were there any that stuck out for you?
I think mine would be The Notion Club Papers. Did you catch the title page?

Beyond Lewis
Or
Out of the Talkative Planet
Being a fragment of an apocryphal Inklings’ saga,
made by some imitator at some time in the 1980s

3. Closing thoughts about friendship:
As I mentioned, there were a few things I had heard before about their friendship, but I felt like people made them much more dramatic than they were. Yes, their friendship shifted in later years, but as the book pointed out, with C.S. Lewis’ death, it was a “wound [Tolkien] knew he [would] not lose, as one loses a falling leaf.” Even years after Lewis’ death Tolkien wrote about Lewis: The unpayable debt that I owe to him was not ‘influence’ as it is ordinarily understood, but sheer encouragement. He was for long my only audience. Only from him did I ever get the idea that my ‘stuff’ could be more than a private hobby. Same with Lewis (just read his thoughts on friendship). They prove that through thick and thin, friendship is a powerful force we all need in life.

I love that their different personalities, instead of separating them, helped them to connect on a deeper level.

“They were enormously important to each other, and had obvious affinities that helped each to keep alive his vision of life.”

I’d love to hear your thoughts about these two!

Where to buy: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Christian Books

Inklings

The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis | The Inklings Series

Welcome to our first post in The Inklings Series! I’m so glad you’re here 🙂 First, I feel we all need to take a moment to appreciate the dedication of this novel:

Seriously. Way too much genius for one friendship circle.

Alright, now onto discussing this fabulous book! Although written in 1941, the lessons and wisdom from this book apply just as much as today as it did then. That alone blows my mind. It’s an original and genius piece of work, whether you consider the truths Lewis wrestles with, the names (Our Father Below (satan) vs. The Enemy (God) ) or any other aspect of this book. I want to include every quote I highlighted, but that would quickly escalate into the world’s longest blog post, so instead I’ll settle for some key points :).

The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis is a classic masterpiece of religious satire that entertains readers with its sly and ironic portrayal of human life and foibles from the vantage point of Screwtape, a highly placed assistant to “Our Father Below.” At once wildly comic, deadly serious, and strikingly original, C.S. Lewis’s The Screwtape Letters is the most engaging account of temptation—and triumph over it—ever written.

There were several times throughout the letters where it seemed as though it was written just for me. Today. Here and now. That’s when you know it’s a classic. Whether the chapter on prayer (I was rather encouraged to become “very far advanced in the Enemy’s service.”), humility (i.e. becoming proud of one’s humility) or modesty (which he called what modern day advertising would become decades before it happened), each chapter had me thinking through plenty of things.

“For if he ever comes to make the distinction, if he consciously directs his prayers ‘Not to what I think thou art but to what thou know art thyself to be’, our situation is, for the moment, desperate.”

One of the biggest themes (or tools of “The Father Below”) I found was one of distraction. That’s definitely how I become complacent in my faith and in my life. Never does temptation come across as a little devil on our shoulder with a pitchfork, but as Lewis so eloquently points out, it’s in a quieter, almost non-noticeable way. Those times of simply getting people to focus on daily life distractions. Before we know it, something good has become twisted.

“It is funny how mortals always picture us as putting things into their minds: in reality our best work is done by keeping things out.”

“Everything has to be twisted before it’s any use to us.”

This is one of my favorites:

“You will say that these are very small sins; and doubtless, like all young tempters, you are anxious to be able to report spectacular wickedness. But do remember, the only thing that matters is the extent to which you separate the man from the Enemy. It does not matter how small the sins are provided that their cumulative effect is to edge the man away from the Light and out into Nothing. Murder is no better than cards if cards can do the trick. Indeed the safest road to Hell is the gradual one – the gentle slope, soft underfoot, without sudden turnings, without milestones, without signposts…” (emphasis mine)

On the other hand, God isn’t about removing things, but rather filling us up. A great example of the opposite of this is Screwtape’s anger toward Wormwood reveals how satan works (i.e. when he gets so mad he turns into a centipede). Yet, Lewis gives us hope in the truths that God wants to make our lives beautiful and full.

“The real centre, what the Enemy calls the Heart.”

“We want cattle who can finally become food; He wants servants who can finally become sons. We want to suck in, He wants to give out. We are empty and would be filled; He is full and flows over. Our war aim is a world in which Our Father Below has drawn all other beings into himself: the Enemy wants a world full of beings united to Him but still distinct.”

“To get the man’s soul and give him nothing in return – that is what really gladdens Our Father’s heart.”

I’ll close out my thoughts with this quote – I love the description of the Patient’s understanding upon reaching the heavenly realms.
“But when he saw them he knew that he had always known them and realised what part each one of them played at many an hour in his life when he had supposed himself alone, so that now he could say to them, one by one, not ‘Who are you?’ but ‘So it was you all the time.’ “

Alright, here’s some questions to open up discussion:
1. If you could sum up the message(s) of this book in a sentence, how would you? Think elevator pitch for this book. 😉
2. What are some of your favorite quotes?
3. What did you think of the ending? It’s been so long since I’ve read it, I totally forgot how it ended! Anyway, would love to hear what you thought!

And here’s my answers:
1. I’ll just sum it up right quick: That what God wants for each of us is better than we can imagine. That when he asks you to “lose yourself” in Him, it’s so we can gain something much more beautiful. On the other hand, satan seeks out ways to destroy our souls. (Like when Screwtape asks Wormwood “And anyway, why should the creature be happy?”). Also, satan’s attacks are much more subtle and dangerous than blatant attacks.

2. Since I’ve already included about 57,000 quotes, here’s one more that had me laughing out loud:
“For we must never forget what is the most repellent and inexplicable trait in our enemy; He really loves the hairless bipeds He has created…” (I wasn’t laughing at the part of He loves us – because internet high fives all around for that – but the part where Screwtape calls humans hairless bipeds. Cracked me up!)

3. I forgot that the Patient was killed during an air raid. It takes a skilled writer who can create a character with no name, yet one the readers (or at least me) become attached to. And was that not a fantastically creepy way to sign off a letter? “Your increasingly and ravenously affectionate uncle”…aka “I’m going to eat you.” Have I mentioned I love this book?

Just because I really enjoyed reading C.S. Lewis’ thoughts on writing this book (and in case your version didn’t include C.S. Lewis’ thoughts on writing it), here they are:
“Though it was easy to twist one’s mind into the diabolical attitude, it was not fun, or not for long. The strain produced a sort of spiritual cramp. The world into which I had to project myself while I spoke through Screwtape was all dust, grit, thirst and itch. Every trace of beauty, freshness and geniality had to be excluded. It almost smothered me before I was done. It would have smothered my readers if I had prolonged it.”

Please feel free to include any other thoughts or questions! I’m all about a good discussion 🙂

Where to buy: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Christian Books

Bookish Radness

These Are My Confessions (All 7)

Anyone else start singing/dancing to Usher’s Confessions Part II when reading the title to this post? You wouldn’t be alone if you did, just so you know!

But here they are internet…my confessions.

Of the booknerd sort. Sorry TMZ.

1. I have yet to watch a book trailer (Wait, I just lied, I’ve watched the two that have been posted on my blog). More accurate would be I’ve never felt compelled to watch them. It’s not that I hate them, more so it only takes an intriguing description or trusted recommendation for me to want to pick it up.

2. There’s some “classics” I refuse to read or I have endured them and hate them. My friend, Brooke, reminded me of this with a book known as Wuthering Heights. Are there some good quotes? A few. But y’all…de.press.ing (fans of this book, let’s still be friends k?). Another one? Kafka. Please tell me how a person turning into a cockroach is revolutionary in literature. I’m all ears.

I shall stop now, lest you think I really don’t like books.

3. I have a hard time adding star ratings to books. If I don’t really like a book, I feel like a horrible person. I know it’s ridiculous because there’s no way I’ll connect with every book, but I can’t help but think of how much work the person put into it. Unless it’s Moby Dick or one of the aforementioned classics, then I have no qualms about ripping that a new one ;). But seriously, when amazon makes you pick stars… PEOPLE TOO MUCH PRESSURE. I know a 4 Star, even 3 is still good, but man never thought picking stars would be so hard.

I know it’s simply my personality. In college, I was the Sports Editor for our newspaper my senior year and I had a weekly column called Lap’s Low Down (go ahead and be amazed at the decisions of my youth). I loved the position, but I found it impossible to be “mean.” Like when one of our teams lost to the last place team in the league, I couldn’t bring myself to write a column about it (which would have been easy to get a laugh out of it). All bets off when it comes to professional teams though. Don’t mess with my boys in purple and gold (Lakers) or my Who Dat boys! Bring it on Seattle.

4. This has been mentioned before, but I’m going to toss it in again. I want to punch Movie Tie-in Book Covers in the wrists. I don’t know what it is, maybe I see them as posers. Kinda like Little Debbie’s Cloud Cakes. Nice try, but those aren’t Twinkies.

5. I’m not a fan of novellas. They end too fast. I understand that’s the whole point, but still…

6. This has nothing to do with reading (well kinda) but I’ve had about four sips of coffee in my life and all were horrible. So when I’m reading, I prefer my tea.

7. I prefer covers that don’t have models on them, more specifically when you can see their faces. You may have already guessed this from this previous blog, but I thought I would discuss this one a bit more. You see, I love art. If someone wanted to pay me to get a Master’s Degree I would get two ;). Finish my one in History and add an Art History one. The depth of emotion a beautiful piece of art can invoke (Impressionism is one such style) is one reason I love it so much. So when a cover has these artistic elements, to me, it reveals the heart of the novel. I love when I can get the vibe of the novel with a simple glance at the cover.

Plus, I always develop my own ideas of how a character looks, so give me mysterious over anything else. I also admit I’m a font snob. There, I said it.

I feel like a rebel writing this confession, since the genre I read the most (Christian fiction) uses models more than any other genre I read. Which on a side note, I’m really curious why. Any publishers out there want to chime in? Is it to separate genres? I’m genuinely curious. (My friend Rel has a fabulous discussion about this by the way. Check it out here!)

Here’s a few quick ones I love:

Will covers with models stop me from reading my favorite authors? NEVER! 😉 But I do have to admit I find myself being hesitant on occasion with authors I don’t know. Sorry y’all – who knew I was on such a book cover mission!

Alright, now that I’ve shared, I want to hear from you! Do any of these vibe with you? Or maybe you totally disagree! This is a safe place, I want to hear! What confessions would you add?

Movie Musings

Why the Hey Did I Watch These Movies as a Child? Plus Some 80s Classics

Today’s kids grew up on Harry Potter. You know what they missed out on? Movies featuring balls of fur rolling around eating people.

Jealousy, my friends, should be the only response.

Today belongs to my youth. Today’s post is an ode to my youth and the crazy movies I stumbled upon. Why I watched many of these, one will never know. Will I include photos for the first half? No. That image search would give me nightmares.

So without further ado, here’s three of my “favorites.” And by “favorites” I mean, what.the.hey.

IT – I’ve talked about this many times before. That’s probably a hint for all you psychologists about the effect this had on me. Clearly I’m still working through my issues of a murderous clown preying on small children on rainy days. What a great film to watch before the age of 10. By that I mean DON’T.EVER.WATCH.THIS.FILM. I should also bold that last statement just to get the point across. I still have the dialogue between Georgie and IT in the sewer seared in my brain. Apparently I thought it would make me seem cool if I watched it. It didn’t.  (I should confess…my parents had no idea I watched this until after the damage was done)

Arachnophobia – The name says it all kids. The name says it all. It’s bad enough I watched this when I was eight. It’s even worse I WANTED to see it on my birthday. Because nothing says happy birthday to an eight year old child like a screaming spider flying across the screen. I still remember the amount of air I got during the first scene that included a spider jumping out of a plant. I guess I thought I was ready to act like I was 30. Kids, don’t grow up too fast. There’s plenty of time for that. But who am I kidding?? If a movie like this came out now, you wouldn’t see me near it. The fear Indy has of snakes doesn’t come close to my hatred of spiders.

Critters – After watching this, I couldn’t touch an Easter egg for years (the little jerks hatched from eggs and unsuspecting people painted them as Easter eggs one year in the movie). According to wiki, this series (why yes, there was more than one) is about “a group of malevolent carnivorous aliens from outer space, called Krites, that have the ability to roll into balls and combine into a pernicious sphere that can roll across the landscape and cause mayhem. In appearance, the individual Krites resemble small furry/spiky animals with large mouths and many sharp teeth. Throughout the movies they attack humans by biting and attempting to eat them, or at least a piece of them.” Why wouldn’t you want to watch such a film??

But friends, not all my childhood was full of petrifying films. Oh no! I grew up in the 80s aka the decade of awesomeness. Photos from these? Heck yes, they’ll give you a clue to the incredible-ness of each film.


Back to the Future – This is a given. “McFlyyyyyyy!” The good news is, 2015 is just around the corner, so I’m pretty excited for the hover board to finally make its appearance. Oh and flying cars.

Goonies – If you have to ask why, then please stop being my friend. Unless it’s because you are young, then I’ll gladly regale in tales of this film. Every time I watch this movie, I still want to drop everything and go look for a pirate ship.

Every Disney cartoon ever created. Except The Fox and the Hound. Kuddos to producing the second most depressing cartoon ever Disney (second only to Dumbo).

Cloak and Dagger – It took awhile for me not to fear the Riverwalk, less I get kidnapped by a crazy grandma lady with missing fingers, but I simply love this film! Following little Davey, who stumbles across secret information from spies in a video game, it’s full of adventure and espionage. Seriously, still one of my favs. Plus, you have to appreciate the old school video games they have.

Flight of the Navigator – This film makes me want a pet alien. It’s a simple plot really: “In 1978, a boy is moved 8 years into the future and has an adventure with the alien ship that is responsible for that.” It’s as awesome as it sounds. “Compliance!”

Labyrinth – The only negative of this film is David Bowie’s creepy pants. Other than that, it pretty much sums up the 80s (and maybe the effects of the 70s….) “Allo….No, I said “‘allo,” but that’s close enough.”

Dark Crystal – Between this and Labyrinth, it makes me wonder what was going on with Jim Henson during the creation of these films. This movie is so tripped out I don’t even know how to describe it. All I know is my siblings and I loved the recorded-from-TV version we had and watched it all the time. Well, if you must know, here’s the official description: “On another planet in the distant past, a Gelfling embarks on a quest to find the missing shard of a magical crystal, and so restore order to his world.” Add puppets and you know that’s award-winning material right there.

Alright my fellow children of the 80s (or anyone else really), what are some of your favorites? And for you youngins (I kid! I kid!) who grew up in the 90s, what are your favs (because I’ll actually remember those like yesterday)?

Bookish Radness

Okay, so I’m a Book Cover Snob…

I’ve been working on a fun confessions-type blog and in writing it, I’ve come to realize I’m kind of a book cover snob. Of all the things right? Sometimes I think I’m 12. But no world, I am not. You need to add a couple decades and that’s a bit closer.

But what do I love? The classics. Something about them – I want to frame each of the covers. So today I claim as book cover love day. I wish such a holiday would allow me a day off, but apparently my company doesn’t go for made up holidays on a whim. Whatevs.

Without further ado, these are the type of covers I want blown up on canvas and all over my library.

After reading this novel (and absolutely loving it), this mysterious and dark cover fits it perfectly. Have you read Rebecca? You need to if you haven’t!!
Maybe I love this because it reminds me of the awesome Disney vintage ride posters at the park and I love Disneyland. And y’all know my love of The Hobbit, so if you toss them together…Win. Plus it’s easy to almost miss Bilbo at the bottom, but when you find him – love!
I haven’t read much Cummings, but I still love the vintage vibe.
Can we first talk about the price? $1.95. Let’s bring these prices back. But this was also the first of the Narnia series I read and while it’s one of the lesser known ones, I loved it!
I’m so glad schools have to read this book because it really is one of the greatest pieces of literature. I think I need to read it again soon.
So creative!
Only because I love this book.
This fits the book so well.
The pipe people! The pipe!
Minus the fact that fahrenheit is probably the hardest word in the English language to spell, I love the book that uses it in the title.
This one gets a shout out based on the simplistic genius of this poster.
I hated everything about this book, but I can respect a very fitting cover.
Please tell me you get this. Please!!
I’m not really sorry for all the Lord of the Rings covers because, I mean, they’re all awesome.
I can’t help but smile every time I see this cover (or cry – stupid spider). But nostalgia at its finest.
I’ve seen this beautiful watercolor around Pinterest and other blogs and I think they are so beautiful. I recently found out they are by the artist Sara Singh (http://www.sarasingh.com/). I want one.
And one more for your viewing pleasure!

So how about y’all? What do you prefer in a book cover?